vineyard vineyard vineyard

Feed aggregator

Honey Mustard Chicken Grilled Cheese

Honey Mustard Chicken and Apple Grilled Cheese

Here’s the truth: I could eat a grilled cheese sandwich every day for the rest of my life.

Honey Mustard Chicken and Apple Grilled Cheese

The balance of flavors and textures is just, well, perfect. Crunchy toast and gooey cheese combine to create one of the most satisfying bites in the world.

Honey Mustard Chicken and Apple Grilled Cheese

But there’s another reason I like the toasted sandwich so, so, so much.

Honey Mustard Chicken and Apple Grilled Cheese

The format translates beautifully to something more sophisticated, the kind of sandwich you could make two of, plate with a couple gourmet potato chips, and savor with a glass of wine–and a good friend.

Honey Mustard Chicken and Apple Grilled Cheese

Here, I deck out my favorite sandwich with irresistible honey mustard and sweet apple slices, both of which match irresistibly with sharp cheddar on slices of seven-grain. In turn, the grilled cheese, with its sweet flavors and cheesy richness, pairs with a glass (or two!) of Kendall-Jackson Vintner’s Reserve Chardonnay.

Honey Mustard Chicken and Apple Grilled CheeseHoney Mustard Chicken and Apple Grilled Cheese

Maybe it’s the honey mustard or the focus on a a sandwich as dinner, but something about this meal makes me think of picnics, of summer, of lounging out on a blanket in the park. So I’ll take that for what it is: here’s your ticket to a late winter’s picnic!

Honey Mustard Chicken and Apple Grilled Cheese
Print Honey Mustard Chicken & Apple Grilled Cheese Author: Big Girls Small Kitchen Recipe type: Sandwich Cuisine: American Serves: 1   A sophisticated, filling grilled cheese that's perfect with Chardonnay. Ingredients

  • ½ cup chopped cooked chicken
  • 1 tablespoon honey mustard OR 2 teaspoons mustard and 1 teaspoon honey
  • 2 teaspoons mayonnaise
  • Salt
  • Freshly ground pepper
  • 2 ounces sharp cheddar
  • About ½ an apple, cored and sliced (no need to peel)
  • 2 slices bread
  • 1 tablespoon salted butter
Instructions
  1. In a small bowl, combine the chicken with the honey mustard (or honey and mustard) and the mayo. Season with salt and pepper.
  2. Place most of the cheese on the bottom slice of bread. Pile on the apples, then the chicken, pressing down to try to secure everything. Scatter the remaining cheese on top (this helps glue the sandwich together!), then top with the second slice of bread.
  3. Heat a frying pan over medium-low heat for 4 minutes. Add half of the butter, and when it melts, place the sandwich in the pan with a weight on top for best results. (I use a Lodge weight meant just for this purpose, but you could try a second frying pan...or just press down occasionally with your spatula.)
  4. Cook for 5 to 6 minutes, until the bread is golden and the cheese starts to melt. Lift the sandwich up, add the other ½ tablespoon of butter to the pan, flip the sandwich, and cook about 5 minutes on the second side, pressing down again. Let rest for a moment, then cut in half and serve.
3.2.1311

The post Honey Mustard Chicken Grilled Cheese appeared first on Kendall-Jackson Blog.

Categories: North America

Crostini Three Ways | Part Three – Caramelized Blood Orange & Montchevré

BRUSCHETTA0019lr

To kick off your Friday, we are giving you the third and final crostini recipe in hopes that when you have people over this weekend, you will woo them with your sweet new appetizer skills. Lauren Kelp here and we might have saved the best combination for last. If you love the divine combination of caramelized fruit and cheese, this is for you. Meet the final Crostini pairing in our mini-series – The Caramelized Blood Orange & Montchevré!

Missed the first two or confused about what crostini even means? Don’t miss the refreshing Radish & Goat Cheese or Pear, Crispy Sage, and Brie crostini combinations we featured earlier this week. Plus, we paired them up with the perfect wines, so pour a glass and let’s get started!Meet the final Crostini pairing in our mini-series - The Caramelized Blood Orange & Montchevré Crostini! #RecipeLike I mentioned previously, Bruschetta and Crostini are pretty similar. The main differences being the bread they are served on and the freedom of flavor combinations. The crostini is kind of like the bruschetta’s older, crazier sister who changes her hair color once a month. With so many ways to serve a crostini (we’ve given you three so far!), it’s hard to get tired of this fiesty little appetizer.

I have never met a caramelized fruit I didn’t like, so I have to admit, this pairing is my favorite. It’s perfect for having friends over for a drink and appetizer before going out or to satisfy a sweet tooth. Plus, the way the blood orange mingles with the montchevré is out of this world. Paired perfectly with a nice glass (or two) of Pinot Noir and it’s an entertaining no brainer! Meet the final Crostini pairing in our mini-series - The Caramelized Blood Orange & Montchevré Crostini! #Recipe

INGREDIENTS
  • 1 loaf of sliced white bread baguette
  • EVOO
  • 4 oz. of bucheron montchevre
  • 2-3 blood oranges, peeled and thinly sliced into wheels
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 tbsp of water
  • 8 tsp of turbinado sugar

Meet the final Crostini pairing in our mini-series - The Caramelized Blood Orange & Montchevré Crostini! #Recipe Meet the final Crostini pairing in our mini-series - The Caramelized Blood Orange & Montchevré Crostini! #Recipe

INSTRUCTIONS
  • Lightly brush both sides of sliced bread with olive oil and broil until toasted 
  • In a saucepan, stir together the granulated sugar and water. Cook over medium-high heat, swirling the pan occasionally, until the syrup turns a deep amber caramel.
  • Immediately remove from the heat, add the orange slices and swirl the pan to coat them evenly.-
  • Top your toasted bread with 1 oz. of Bucheron Montchevré and 2-3 slices of caramelized oranges
  • Lightly sprinkle with sugar and enjoy!
  • Pair your refreshingly sweet & delicious crostini with a beautiful glass of Pinot Noir and prepare to be in dining heaven!

Meet the final Crostini pairing in our mini-series - The Caramelized Blood Orange & Montchevré Crostini! #RecipeMeet the final Crostini pairing in our mini-series - The Caramelized Blood Orange & Montchevré Crostini! #Recipe

Photography by Constance Higley

FOR MORE AMAZING RECIPES, KEEP UP WITH US ON PINTEREST.

Follow Kendall-Jackson Wines’s board Recipes on Pinterest.

The post Crostini Three Ways | Part Three – Caramelized Blood Orange & Montchevré appeared first on Kendall-Jackson Blog.

Categories: North America

The Cooler Side of Wine Country

Ponte Winery - Temecula, CA - Fri, 02/27/2015 - 08:00


Gorgeousness, sunshine or not

I remember how precious chilly days were growing up in Southern California during the winter months.  They were just about as precious as warm days are here in Western Pennsylvania during the winter months.  A San Diego February equals sunscreen and air conditioners most of the time so when rain appears, the temperature drops below 70 and the breeze gives you goose bumps, it’s cause for celebration.  “Ahh, yes, this is what winter should be,” you say.  So, you dig out your cute scarves and make cocoa, relishing the moment.

Chilly winter days at Ponte are wonderful days, too. Being able to walk the grounds wrapped up in a sweater is just as satisfying as perusing on a warm summer day.  In fact, here are some things at Ponte that are actually better when it’s cold outside:

  1. The Winter Menu at The Restaurant – being a seasonal eatery, many of The Restaurant’s dishes in the winter are comforting, savory and a bit heavier than other seasons.  A steaming bowl of daily soup and the Ragu alla Bolognese with a glass of Super T will feel like a great big hug for your soul.
  2. The fire pits at Ponte Vineyard Inn – staying at our hotel is much more than luxurious rooms, service and serenity (although that’s reason enough to stay with us, no?).  Our guests have access to fire pits just inside the Courtyard where they can sit and enjoy themselves over a bottle of wine.  When the temp drops to 45 degrees at night, you just can’t  beat this.
  3. Carriage Rides – Horse-drawn carriage rides from the Temecula Carriage Co. charm our Members and guests all year round, but, a winter ride, complete with blankets and wine is the stuff memories are made of.  No stifling heat, no humidity, just romantic time spent with your dear one.  Learn about the Country Horse and Carriage Ride Package here.

We don’t have to tell you Southern Californians to take advantage of the chill while it lasts, because, yeah, it probably won’t last very long.  The forecast is predicted to be in the low to mid 60’s through the first few days of March so – you know what to do – dig out your scarves and sweaters and join us in wine country!

Make lunch reservations for The Restaurant here

Reserve your room or suite at Ponte Vineyard Inn here

–Erica Martinez

Categories: North America

Autumn Dining in the Yarra Valley

De Bortoli Wines - Australia - Fri, 02/27/2015 - 07:22

 

2015 Seafood spaghettini - smallFood and wine are so connected that we can’t (or wont) do one without the other. At our Yarra Valley vineyard, our Italian-style ‘Locale’ restaurant has been in operation for 25 years (yikes, I am really showing my age now). For us it is all about showcasing our wines with food and for that same reason we have set up a Cheese shop and maturation room within our Cellar Door Sales.

Adam Mead, our head chef makes delicious food, sourcing as much Adam Mead  -smalllocally as he can, growing as much as he can and relying on good produce from reliable sources. I must say, it speaks volumes to see the contented look on customers faces after dining in the restaurant. Autumn is such a lovely time to visit too. You could be dining in the restaurant, supping on our 2012 Shiraz whilst seeing the 2015 Shiraz being harvested right outside the window. Now isn’t that worth a visit!

Restaurant new windows - smallJust in case you are interested, the restaurant (which has undergone some recent renovations) is open from Thursday to Monday for lunch as well as Saturday night for dinner. Phone 03 5965 2271 or book online at debortoliyarra.com.au. Hope to see you soon

Cheers

Leanne de Bortoli

To keep posted with daily happenings and other events, check us out on twitter, instagram, facebook

The post Autumn Dining in the Yarra Valley appeared first on De Bortoli Wines Blog.

Categories: Oceania

2014 Vintage Update

Best's Wines - Victoria - Fri, 02/27/2015 - 05:39

Hi all

The 2014 vintage has finally arrived at Great Western, with beautiful clear warm days and cool nights ideal for ripening. During the last week and a half we have received our Old Clone Pinot Noir, Old Vine Pinot Meunier, House Block Riesling and Great Western Chardonnay.  The yields are definitely down this year (up to 60%) due to the cold spring during budburst and flowering and the heat wave in January, but the quality of fruit we are getting is excellent. They are very small bunches but with great concentration of flavour and high balancing acidity. The Old Clone Pinot Noir looks particularly good, a just reward for the time spent on canopy management and crop thinning. 

We hand-picked the Old Clone Pinot Noir and Old Vine Pinot Meunier last week which isn't the most comfortable thing to do. These old vines are much shorter in stature meaning a lot of crouching is required to pick the grapes. This fruit was then hand-sorted to ensure only the best berries made it into the fermenter. This gave us a great opportunity to really look at the quality and bunch sizes too.

We have a great crew this year with Alessio (who was here in 2012) from Abruzzo, Italy providing ample latin passion. Then there is Kim from Northern Ireland and Hugo from Bordeaux in France adding some western European flair, and the local stalwarts of Andy, Leanne, Simon, Hadyn and Nicole providing the solid game winning backline. All are enthusiastically giving lots of love and attention to our potential 2014 wines!

This week sees the remainder of the Riesling being picked and the start of our Shiraz harvest. The Shiraz is looking really good too with modestly spoken Viv Thomson even saying it ‘...could be a good year for Shiraz'. Viv believes the small bunches and berries will have great concentration and result in a complex yet balanced wine. 

That's all from us at the moment. I better head back out into the vineyard to check on our Thomson Family Shiraz which is scheduled to be picked on Friday. 

Cheers
Justin

 

Categories: Oceania

Innovative Farming in Our Spire Pinot Noir Block

Cuvaison Estate Wines - Napa Valley, CA - Thu, 02/26/2015 - 18:06

 

Being farmers, we accept that Mother Nature will throw us a curve ball every now and then. With our 36 year legacy of farming our Carneros Estate Vineyard, along with Winemaker Steve's expertise, we are positioned to optimally handle just about any agricultural challenge headed our way.  

Over the past few years, Winemaker Steve Rogstad has observed signs of a developing grapevine trunk condition in our prized Spire Pinot Noir block. When the condition (called Eutypa) is left unmanaged, it has the potential to cause a decreased yield, and interfere with the vine's ability to properly ripen fruit, therefore compromising quality. 

Steve has chosen an uncommon yet highly innovative and sustainable solution to overcoming the trunk condition, ensuring our Spire block will thrive for many years to come.

Without getting too technical, for the past three years Steve has carefully trained an off-shoot to evolve into what will become the vine’s new trunk. And just last week, his vineyard management team removed the parts of the trunk that have been affected by the
condition. The new shoot will begin to bear fruit this year, and while the yield will be 25-30% less, we anticipate the same high quality and elegant wine we have grown to expect in years' prior.

This is one of many examples of how Steve has resourcefully approached a vineyard management challenge, exemplifying our commitment to innovation, sustainability and uncompromising quality. 

Photo at left: Sharp cut across the top of the main trunk and the newer off-shoot being trained up from the base. Photo at right: Tractor carrying away a load of vines).  

 

Categories: North America

Baked Oysters with Roasted Tomatoes

Baked Oysters with Roasted Tomatoes

A baked oyster is a very, very fine appetizer for any meal but especially one that craves some festivity.

Baked Oysters Topped with Roasted Tomatoes Baked Oysters Topped with Roasted Tomatoes

Forget everything you’ve ever thought about oysters–that they must be eaten raw, that you’re too weak to shuck them, head to your favorite local fishmonger, open a bottle of wine (before you even start cooking), and let’s bake some oysters!

The reason you should open the bottle of wine–here, K-J AVANT Chardonnay, whose body and hint of fruit-forward flavors goes so well with the roasted tomatoes and the seafood (if you like your oysters raw, then you’ll want to pair those with the Kendall-Jackson AVANT Sauvignon Blanc — it pairs so perfectly!) –is that you’re going to have to teach yourself to shuck oysters at home. This isn’t hard, but it could take a couple of attempts. Here’s a demo of how to shuck an oyster. Don’t get frustrated! Once you get one oyster unhinged, it all becomes kind of fun.

Baked Oysters Topped with Roasted Tomatoes Baked Oysters Topped with Roasted Tomatoes

Oh, and while you’re carefully shucking, you’ll also be roasting whole peeled tomatoes from a can so that they turn jammy and sweet and nearly taste like summer. Make extra if this sounds delicious to you: you’ll want them on pasta and sandwiches, not just on oysters.

Anyway, if you’re shucking-challenged, your time is still not wasted.

Baked Oysters Topped with Roasted Tomatoes

The shucked, tomato-topped, butter-gilded oysters then cook on a bed of salt. That helps keep each shell upright and all the juices, which taste like the sea, inside.

When they’re done, you’ll see the tomatoes becoming even more jammy, and the oysters curling up off the sides of their shells.

Baked Oysters Topped with Roasted Tomatoes #KJAVANTBaked Oysters Topped with Roasted Tomatoes

That’s the time to pour new glasses of K-J AVANT Chardonnay and dig in.

Baked Oysters Topped with Roasted Tomatoes

Slurp!
Print Baked Oysters with Roasted Tomatoes Author: Big Girls Small Kitchen Recipe type: Appetizer Cuisine: American Serves: 2   Just a few ingredients turn oysters into an addictive and festive dinner party appetizer. This recipe is easily doubled or tripled to serve a crowd. Ingredients

  • One 14.5 ounce can whole peeled tomatoes, juice drained and reserved for another purpose, like making a Bloody Mary
  • 3 cloves whole garlic
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 6 oysters, shucked
  • About ¾ cup kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • Lemon wedges for garnish
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F. Combine the tomatoes, garlic, and olive oil in a small pan, then place in the oven. Roast for about 45 minutes, until the garlic is golden and the tomatoes are blackened in places. You'll only use 1 or 2 tomatoes in this dish, so reserve any extras for eating on crostini or mixing in with pasta.
  2. Turn the oven to broil. Take a 9-by-9 inch baking pan and arrange the salt in the bottom. Place the oysters in the salt, using the salt to support them so they don't fall over and lose their juices. Mince two of the whole tomatoes and dollop them on top of each oyster. Cut the butter into little wedges and scatter them on the oysters.
  3. Place on the top level of the oven and broil for about 6 minutes, until the oysters have shrunken a bit and the edges are brown. Serve immediately on a plate garnished with lemon wedges.
3.2.1311

The post Baked Oysters with Roasted Tomatoes appeared first on Kendall-Jackson Blog.

Categories: North America

Winewise Championship 2014 - Outstanding Shiraz

Shaw + Smith - Balhannah, South Australia - Thu, 02/26/2015 - 11:33

We are very happy to receive the Winewise Championship Outstanding score for our 2012 Shiraz, but we are more excited about the comments!

Winewise Championship 2014 (source)

2012 Shaw + Smith Shiraz
"We’ll say it yet again. The Shaw + Smith Shiraz is one of Australia’s best reds. Forget auction prices. Forget the over-hyped “classics”. This is the real deal – opulently varietal, fresh and concentrated, with polished tannins." 

Score: Outstanding

Categories: Oceania

Prost!*

Ponte Winery - Temecula, CA - Thu, 02/26/2015 - 08:00

Strange things are afoot in the world.  Let me ask you a question: what comes to mind when you hear the word, “Germany”?

Let me guess – Beer, BMWs, sausages, Oktoberfest, David Hasselhoff…to name a few.

How about wine?  “Of course!  Gewurztraminer,” you say.  Yes, that lovely white, acidic, refreshing, mineral-y wine that originated in Germany is wonderful.  Buuut, when I say ‘wine’ I mean that in the not-so-distant future, Germany will be the world’s third largest wine consuming nation in the world.  Like, more than Italy.

Whaa?

Yup.  According to market research group The IWSR and released by Vinexpo, Germans are set to consume the highest amount of wine behind the United States and France, by the year 2018.  Two factors are at play here, according to the study; apparently, the Italians love affair with their country’s vineyards is weakening while there is simultaneously a sudden rush on wine sales in Germany.

The report went on to predict that the U.S. would strengthen their lead over France as the biggest wine consuming nation overall.  Read more about this mind-blowing fact here.

Also noteworthy is that the United Kingdom is predicted to get out of their wine funk very soon as well.  Wine sales for our friends across the pond have steadily declined since 2009, but are on track to pick up this year fueled by sparkling and rose wines.  Cheerio, chaps!

What does this mean to you?  Aside from the fact that you can keep your noses held high to zee Frrrench for another few years, it simply means that you’re in good company at Ponte Winery and Ponte Vineyard Inn.  We’re not going anywhere because wine is not going anywhere.  Support your country and help keep our #1 spot by visiting the greatest Temecula winery and #1 rated Temecula hotel soon and often!

–Erica Martinez

*Prost is German for “cheers!”

Categories: North America

How the UK pays 67% of all wine duty in the EU

Chateau Bauduc - Bordeaux, France - Wed, 02/25/2015 - 18:32

We welcome the ’Drop the Duty’ campaign ahead of the 2015 Budget on 18 March. Tax on wine in the UK has gone up by 57% since 2008 but what makes wine duty so unfair is the amount you pay in Britain compared to the continent. Drop doesn’t mean ditch, in this instance, just ’reduce by 2% please, George’.

004632_euro_duty_per_bottle-002

Source: ec.europa.eu, with current exchange rates. Malta has €1.77 wine duty.

With Britain having the second highest duty rate in Europe it’s little wonder, when you look at my duty map, that Britain pays two thirds of all wine duties levied across Europe, according to the The Wine and Spirit Trade Association, or WSTA. After all, there are 60 million people in the UK, compared to less than 24 million in Ireland, Sweden, Finland and Denmark combined.

A small but significant step

The WSTA is pressing for a small reduction of 2% off the fixed duty on wine, which is currently £2.05 plus VAT for still wine and £2.63 plus VAT for sparkling. The campaign invites consumers and the trade to write to their MP with an automatically generated letter, and signing up is easy.

I’ve met Miles Beale, CEO of the WSTA, and he’s a fine fellow. Not surprisingly, we agree with each other wholeheartedly on all this.

“It is clear that the average UK consumer is getting a very rough deal, compared with consumers in the rest of the EU”, Miles says. “Even after the Government’s welcome abolition of the alcohol duty escalator in the 2014 Budget, the current rate of duty being paid by UK consumers remains extremely high.”

004648_BudgetGraph-002The duty escalator was introduced in 2008 by Labour and increased the duty on alcohol by 2% above inflation. This carried on under the Coalition.

I hope that Miles is successful in his quest for this small but politically significant cut. In the 2014 Budget, the Chancellor removed the alcohol duty escalator, cut beer duty by 2% for the second consecutive year and froze spirits and cider duty – but increased wine duty by the rate of inflation (2.5%). It’s high time wine drinkers got a look in.

They don’t make wine in Brussels

Looking at the map above, by the way, you’d be forgiven for thinking that a sort of north-south divide means that wine isn’t taxed for political reasons in the larger wine producing countries (other than for VAT). That’s true, although it’s worth noting that Belgium, which isn’t known for its extensive vineyards, charges just 40p a bottle, compared to the £2.46 Brits pay across the Channel. Both these figures, like those on the map, include the VAT on the duty – it’s a double whammy – but not the VAT on the wine. Every EU country charges VAT on wine, which is fair enough. (Food from shops, by comparison, is zero rated.)

Duty as part of the cost

The real killer for the wine trade and for consumers is that UK duty is part of the upfront cost of the wine, and is charged by HMRC as soon as the wine is taken from an HMRC-controlled or Bonded warehouse to deliver to a restaurant, to someone’s home, or to put on a shelf. It’s not like VAT, which a merchant pays after they’ve been paid.

Duty is part of the cost and a margin is usually applied, quite rightly, to that cost by a retailer or merchant.

(An exception to this rule is if you buy fine wine ’En Primeur’ or ’In Bond’. In these cases, duty is not considered as part of the cost but charged separately on delivery.)

How duty costs more than the wine

Here are examples of two wines that retail in the UK for £5 and £8 respectively. The first would typically be in a supermarket, the second from a supermarket or independent retailer buying direct from a winery in volume. Home delivery costs have not been included in the prices.

004640_bottle6Wine for £5, retail

Take a (cheap) bottle costing £1.05 at source, including 55p bottling and packaging. Add 13p bulk shipping by container, 10p distribution, then add £2.05 UK duty. Sub total £3.33. Add 83p retail margin (20%). Add VAT at 20%. Price on the shelf: £5.

Note that 58% is duty and VAT (£2.89), just 10% is the wine in the bottle, and that the average price paid for a bottle of wine in the UK is around £5.50.

Wine for £8, retail

£2.60 cost of the bottle, including 60p bottling. Add 35p shipping and warehousing, £2.05 duty, £1.66 retail margin (25%) and 20% VAT.

You get much more wine for your money but the £2 worth of liquid in the bottle still costs less than the UK duty.

There are a number of sources for all this, including the comments and follow up from my blog post last year. Victoria Moore also highlighted the cost and tax of £5 and £8 wine in her piece in the Telegraph a few months ago.

 

Likewise, here are two examples of wine sold in in a restaurant or pub.

Restaurant/pub house wine at £17

£1.20 cost of the bottle, including 55p bottling and packaging. Add 20p volume shipping, 15p distribution, then £2.05 duty. Sub total £3.60. Add 65p wine supplier margin (15%), so the wholesale price to the restaurant (known as DPD or duty paid delivered, ex VAT) is £4.25. Multiply by 4 to give the restaurant or pub 70% margin and VAT at 20%. Price on the wine list, £17.

The duty alone is more than triple the cost price of the wine in the bottle.

Restaurant/pub wine for £26

£2.60 cost of the bottle, including 60p bottling (like the £8 bottle above). Add 35p shipping and warehousing, 20p distribution, £2.05 duty, then £1.30 for 20% wine supplier margin. Wholesale price, ex VAT: £6.50. Multiply by 4 to give the restaurant 70% margin and 20% VAT, for a list price of £26. Again, the duty costs more than the wine in the bottle.

(Many restaurants reduce the margin % on more expensive wines, but at this price point 70% margin is about the norm. It is no secret that this is how they have to make their money.)

 

What all this information shows is that for the vast majority of bottles of wine bought by UK consumers, the amount paid in duty is greater than the value of the liquid in the bottle.

And that, when you look at what our friends in the EU pay, is just wrong.

Feel free to comment or share this post. Thanks.

Categories: Europe

Coyam 2012

Viñedos Emiliana - Chile - Wed, 02/25/2015 - 13:09

Gold Medal
Berliner Wein Trophy 2015

Categories: South America

Novas Cabernet Sauvignon / Merlot 2013

Viñedos Emiliana - Chile - Wed, 02/25/2015 - 13:06

Gold Medal
Berliner Wein Trophy 2015

Categories: South America

Crostini Three Ways | Part Two – Pear, Brie, & Sage

Untitled 3

Lauren Kelp here & we’re back with part two of our Crostini Three Way mini-series & this pairing is a real treat! But first, what did you think of the refreshing Radish & Goat Cheese crostini? Did you try it with the chilled glass of Sauvignon Blanc? To die for, wasn’t it? If you loved the nice crisp taste of the last crostini, you are going to love today’s combo – Pear, Brie, and Crispy Sage! So pull up a chair, pour yourself a nice glass of wine (I love Riesling for this combo), and let’s get started…

This combination of sweet pear, slightly salty crispy sage, mixed with the flavors of the brie will have your guests totally impressed, not to mention your taste buds! #recipe #crostiniLike I mentioned previously, the real difference between Bruschetta and Crostini is the bread they are served on. The only other “difference” is that crostini’s have lots of different combos and flavor pairings, while bruschetta are typically served, well, like bruschetta. Why mess up a good thing, right?

Entertaining is all about playing with flavors, trying things out, and having some fun. When I am prepping crostini for appetizers for my guests, I like to think of them as mini dishes. Each crostini has to blend together – the flavors of the toasted baguette, with the cheese, and the fruit or vegetable pairing on top, not to mention the spices that top it off! This combination of sweet pear, slightly salty crispy sage, mixed with the flavors of the brie will have your guests totally impressed, not to mention your taste buds! This combination of sweet pear, slightly salty crispy sage, mixed with the flavors of the brie will have your guests totally impressed, not to mention your taste buds! #recipe #crostini

INGREDIENTS
  • 1 loaf of sliced white bread baguette
  • 4 oz. of brie
  • 2 Bosc pears, thinly sliced
  • 20 medium to large fresh sage leaves
  • salt
  • pepper
  • EVOO

This combination of sweet pear, slightly salty crispy sage, mixed with the flavors of the brie will have your guests totally impressed, not to mention your taste buds! #recipe #crostiniThis combination of sweet pear, slightly salty crispy sage, mixed with the flavors of the brie will have your guests totally impressed, not to mention your taste buds! #recipe #crostini

INSTRUCTIONS
  • Brush both sides of sliced bread with olive oil and broil until toasted
  • Lightly coat sage leaves with EVOO and sprinkle with salt and pepper.
  • Set oven to 350 degrees and bake sage leaves for 8-10 minutes, or until crisp
  • Top bread with 1 oz of brie and 3 pear slices
  • Crumble crispy sage and sprinkle on top. Enjoy!
  • Pair your sweet & salty crostini with a chilled glass of Riesling and prepare to be in dining heaven!

This combination of sweet pear, slightly salty crispy sage, mixed with the flavors of the brie will have your guests totally impressed, not to mention your taste buds! #recipe #crostiniThis combination of sweet pear, slightly salty crispy sage, mixed with the flavors of the brie will have your guests totally impressed, not to mention your taste buds! #recipe #crostini

Photography by Constance Higley

 

For more amazing recipes, keep up with us on Pinterest.

 

Follow Kendall-Jackson Wines’s board Recipes on Pinterest.

The post Crostini Three Ways | Part Two – Pear, Brie, & Sage appeared first on Kendall-Jackson Blog.

Categories: North America

Adobe Carmenere 2014

Viñedos Emiliana - Chile - Wed, 02/25/2015 - 12:52

Gold Medal
Berliner Wein Trophy 2015

Categories: South America

Recent winner of the Shaw + Smith vertical Shiraz and Nick Mount decanter

Shaw + Smith - Balhannah, South Australia - Wed, 02/25/2015 - 11:19

Congratulations to Jane Glasson - you won the Shaw + Smith vertical Shiraz and Nick Mount decanter.
Thank you to everyone who has entered our recent competition.

Categories: Oceania

Our line-up of new vintage Bauduc wines, Spring 2015

Chateau Bauduc - Bordeaux, France - Tue, 02/24/2015 - 20:17

There’ll be no shortage of hype about Bordeaux 2014 – ‘an Indian summer of historic proportions’ and all that. Whilst we won’t be offering our 2014 red en primeur, our two whites and our rosé have just been bottled and are ready to go. Here’s a run-down of the new wines on offer this Spring, including a new red and our Sauternes from the 2011 vintage. (2011? Blimey, time flies). You can order them here for delivery in the UK, or here for collection from Calais.

004269-BAUDUC-bb2014Château Bauduc Sauvignon Blanc 2014

2014 has turned out to be a very good vintage, with good weather for the flowering in June, a fairly cool summer and then a lovely September both before and during the harvest. We made this crisp, dry white from the blocks of Sauvignon Blanc that surround the chateau. An upmarket house wine that is grassy, zingy, refreshing and versatile, and bottled with a Stelvin+ screwcap.

The 2014 has just been selected by Restaurant Gordon Ramsay once again as the house white at his eponymous three Michelin star establishment in London, and we’ll soon be going to see Rick Stein for the annual, slightly nervy ’man from Del Monte’ moment. (Gordon leaves it to his head sommeliers and wine buyer, in truth, but Rick still likes to keep his oar in at The Seafood in Padstow.)

Here are some pictures of the Sauvignon harvest. You can order the wine direct from us for UK delivery.

 

004269-BAUDUC-Rose2014Château Bauduc Rosé 2014

Dry and uber-pale like a rosé from Provence but, unlike the pink from Peter Mayle country, this was made from the juice of Merlot (two thirds) and Cabernet Sauvignon (one third). We select the parcels of red on the estate that we want to use for the rosé, and then harvest them slightly earlier than for our rouge. That way the rosé has the acidity and the freshness we’re looking for and isn’t too heavy or high in alcohol.

The wine is made from just the ’free-run’ juice, so only the slightest colour is drawn from the dark skins into the pale extract before we cool-ferment it. A wine for the summer, of course, although we drink it all year round with the occasional Thai green curry and other spicy dishes. Stelvin+ screwcap.

You can order the wine direct from us for UK delivery.

 

 

les3hectbl_back_label_14Château Bauduc
Les Trois Hectares blanc 2014

Longstanding customers will know by now that this dry white comes from a single, 7 acre block of Sémillon vines which was planted in 1947. Not old vines, mind, just comfortably middle aged. In fact, back in the day they weren’t too accurate with the precise varieties they planted, and we reckon now that around 20% of the vineyard is, in fact, Sauvignon Blanc. We now call this a ’field blend’ in that the assemblage is created in the vineyard.

The yield from these mature vines is consistently low, so there’s not much of it. We’re more likely to drink this with food than on its own but this could just be a habit. Victoria Moore of the Telegraph rather astutely referred to the wine as ’meadowy’.

Available for UK delivery here.

 

les3hectrouge_back_label_11Château Bauduc
Les Trois Hectares rouge 2011

Les Trois Hectares 2011 is an artisanal affair. It was made from vines with fewer bunches for greater concentration and harvested entirely by hand. It’s mostly Merlot with a healthy dollop of Cabernet Sauvignon in the blend, and was aged in small French oak barrels. This is a wine that can be drunk now although it will continue to improve in bottle. There’s no rush, in line with many really good red Bordeaux from this vintage.

Decant if you can to give this fairly powerful wine a chance to open up. We’ll be posting the story and plenty of pictures on our blog shortly.

Order for UK delivery here.

 
 
 
 

And a wine that we introduced last Autumn that you should seriously consider.

bxSauternes_back_2011Bauduc Sauternes 2011

Sauternes has to come from the designated region on the other side of the Garonne from us, so we worked with a fifth-generation grower there and bottled the wine at Bauduc.
2011 was a terrific vintage when the celebrated ‘noble rot’ took hold, shrivelling the skins of the grapes and concentrating the natural sweetness of the juice. The grapes were hand picked in three separate sweeps from 2 hectares (5 acres) of low-yielding, 60 year-old Sémillon vines that are sandwiched between the vineyards of two prestigious chateaux.

Served by the glass and in 50cl bottles at Rick Stein’s Seafood Restaurant, Gordon Ramsay and Hotel du Vin. The wine can be ordered here.

Categories: Europe

Château Palmer celebrates its 200th anniversary in music!

Château Palmer - France - Tue, 02/24/2015 - 17:00
Christophe_Dal_Sasso_300dpi_(c)_Eric Garault_Pascoandco copie.jpgOn the occasion of the 6th edition of Hear Palmer, Château Palmer will welcome the Big Band of the artist Dal Sasso on 27th March 2015. 
Fourteen artists will give a unique jazz concert at the property, in the main cellar, to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the Château and to look back at a key period in its history: the acquisition of the estate by General Charles Palmer. The Big Band will interpret each important stage in the construction of the Château Palmer estate. It will be an event in which Jazz music transports us from 1814 to the present day, while also unveiling the new 2014 vintage. 
The event will continue the next day, Saturday 28th March 2015 at Rocher de Palmer in Cenon, with the performance of John Coltrane's masterpiece A Love Supreme by the Dal Sasso Big Band. 
You can already buy tickets for this unique event through the Rocher de Palmer website. 30 tickets are available. 
PASS 2 CONCERTS - Concert Friday 27 March at 19h at Château Palmer + Concert Saturday 28 March at Rocher de Palmer
Categories: Europe

Photo Essay: Green, Green, Green

Tablas Creek Vineyard - Paso Robles CA - Tue, 02/24/2015 - 00:48

Normally, the sign at the edge of our head-trained Mourvedre vineyard just outside our tasting room is to protect people from a twisted ankle, should they stray off the tarmac. Now, we're worried we might lose them in the cover crop!

Sign

The growth in the vineyard's green winter coat over the last month has been amazing to watch. Whether because of the three dry years which preceded this one, or because of the work we've been doing with soil fertility, or because of the year's relative warmth (or some combination) we've never seen a cover crop so lush.  Another view, looking up the hill behind the winery that we call Mt. Mourvedre:

Looking up mt mourvedre

Everything is growing. Yes, the cover crops that we planted are growing fast, but we're seeing lots of native grasses and wildflowers, like the mustards you see below:

Mustard

The yellow of the mustard isn't the only hue on display.  We're also seeing our sweet peas flowering:

Sweet pea

And this pretty purple wildflower that grows low to the ground:

Purple wildflowe

And it is wet. Although it hasn't rained much since the 3.9" we received the first weekend of February, the soils are still loaded with moisture, as evidenced by the ubiquity of the water-loving plant miner's lettuce, which we barely saw the last two winters:

Miners lettuce

And, if you needed more evidence, either of the wet soils or of the hazards of trekking into the vineyard, check out my shoes after this morning's photography trip:

Shoes

Now, our chief worry shifts to early budbreak. We've been reading about it from nearby regions, and were frightened to see photographic evidence of it getting nearer from our neighbors at Adelaida Cellars over the weekend.  We're typically a few weeks behind Adelaida and the other less-frosty vineyards at the tops of the hills to the east of us, and are still in a window where a few frosty nights would likely give us a reprieve rather than damage.  But barring a freeze, we're on track for an earlier budbreak than last year, when its mid-March arrival led me to write the blog Why we're dreading the 2014 frost season.

Fingers crossed, please, everyone.

Categories: North America

Crostini Three Ways | Part One – Radish & Goat Cheese

BRUSCHETTA0013lr

When entertaining, whether for a party of forty-five of four, it’s important to have a plate of delicious appetizers for your guests to munch on in preparation of the main event. Lauren Kelp here of LaurenKelp.com & while I love a good cheese plate (who doesn’t?!), sometimes it’s fun to spice things up and play a little! That is why I love a good crostini. They are simple to make, have an incredible range of flavor options, and will impress your guests without having to bust out your Grandma’s recipe book!When entertaining, whether for a party of forty-five of four, it's important to have a plate of delicious appetizers for your guests to munch on in preparation of the main event. That is why I love a good crostini. So here are three delicious crostini recipes that will keep your friends and guests happy before the grand event. #appetizers

Today is day one of a three part series where we breakdown a delicious crostini combination, plus, of course, it’s perfect wine pairing. An appetizer is only as good as the wine it’s paired with, right?

First up – The Radish & Goat Cheese combo. The combination of creamy goat cheese, crisp radishes, and moments of chives makes this the perfect appetizer as we transition into warm(er) weather.

This Radish & Goat Cheese crostini's combination of creamy goat cheese, crisp radishes, and moments of chives makes for the perfect appetizer as we transition into warm(er) weather. #recipe

So, what’s the difference between crostini and bruschetta anyway? Simple answer – the bread! Bruschetta is made by toasting whole or wide slices of rustic Italian bread, or a sourdough. Crostini is made by toasting smaller, rounder slices, like from a baguette. If you want to get super fancy, a typical Crostini appetizer involves several combinations and variations, where as a plate of Bruschetta is typically served one way.

This Radish & Goat Cheese crostini's combination of creamy goat cheese, crisp radishes, and moments of chives makes for the perfect appetizer as we transition into warm(er) weather. #recipe

This Radish & Goat Cheese crostini's combination of creamy goat cheese, crisp radishes, and moments of chives makes for the perfect appetizer as we transition into warm(er) weather. #recipe

INGREDIENTS
  • 1 loaf of sliced white bread baguette
  • 8 oz. of goat cheese
  • 3/4 oz chives (minced)
  • 5 small radishes thinly sliced
  • salt
  • pepper
  • EVOO

This Radish & Goat Cheese crostini's combination of creamy goat cheese, crisp radishes, and moments of chives makes for the perfect appetizer as we transition into warm(er) weather. #recipe

INSTRUCTIONS
  • Brush both sides of sliced bread with olive oil and broil until toasted
  • Whip goat cheese and chives together in a blender until fluffy (for an extra twist, add a tiny bit of honey to the mix)
  • In a small pan, lightly sauté radishes with EVOO and season with salt and pepper to taste
  • Top your toasted bread with the goat cheese mix and enough radishes to cover
  • Sprinkle with pepper and enjoy!
  • Pair your refreshingly crisp crostini with a chilled glass of Sauvignon Blanc and prepare to be in dining heaven!

This Radish & Goat Cheese crostini's combination of creamy goat cheese, crisp radishes, and moments of chives makes for the perfect appetizer as we transition into warm(er) weather. #recipe

This Radish & Goat Cheese crostini's combination of creamy goat cheese, crisp radishes, and moments of chives makes for the perfect appetizer as we transition into warm(er) weather. #recipe

Photography by Stancy Higley

 

For more amazing recipes, keep up with us on Pinterest.

 

Follow Kendall-Jackson Wines’s board Recipes on Pinterest.

The post Crostini Three Ways | Part One – Radish & Goat Cheese appeared first on Kendall-Jackson Blog.

Categories: North America

Mystery in Wine Country

Ponte Winery - Temecula, CA - Mon, 02/23/2015 - 08:00

It could be an episode of Dateline.  I can hear Keith Morrison’s voice now…

“It was Christmas Eve in Yountville, California, a town in the heart of Napa wine country and home of celebrated restaurant, The French Laundry. 

Anthony Bourdain, former chef, author and television host: The best restaurant in the world.  Period.

Operating as a restaurant since the late 1970’s, it wasn’t until 1994 when famed chef Thomas Keller bought the historic, 19th century structure and turned it into what is a favorite among lauded chefs, food enthusiasts, restaurant critics and bucket list writers.

On that Christmas Eve in 2014 Keller’s staff hosted another sold-out evening and closed as normal.  They now looked forward to a day off the next day – Christmas Day.  No one could have guessed that this seemingly idyllic landmark would soon be the target of a phenomenal wine heist that would lead police and investigators 3,000 miles away to North Carolina.”


Scene of the crime – The French Laundry in Yountville, CA

The story made front page news.  At some point that Christmas afternoon during a very short window in which no one was present at the restaurant, a person or persons broke in and robbed this establishment of 76 wine bottles worth an estimated $300,000.  Among the stolen were rare wines that fetch up to $15,000 for a single bottle.

This story particularly caught our eye because:

A. we are in the wine industry and while our Ponte wines aren’t valued as high as the aforementioned bottle (some who still own bottles of our ’97 Zinfandel Port may disagree), any mention of wine theft makes our skin crawl.  And…

B. we are in the restaurant industry and, sorry, but we all aspire to be at least a little like The French Laundry in some way.

Keller’s response to the incident reminded us why we all admire him so much:

“I don’t want to downplay it,” he said.  “It’s very expensive wine and it will be very difficult to replace it.  But nobody was hurt.  I’m just grateful that nothing happened, like one of the young servers coming in on their day off because they forgot something in their locker and stumbling across it.  That would have been terrible.”

He’s right.  It’s just wine – enough to sell and buy a nice house – but just wine.

The strangest twist in the story came not even a month later when a majority of the stolen wines were recovered in a wine cellar in Greensboro, N.C.  No arrests have been made but the investigation is ongoing.

Here on the home front at Ponte, we’re not so worried that these fine folks who committed this crime are targeting us next.  While we produce good wine, excellent wine even, our business is based on hospitality.  And a good overall experience – from wine to food to hotel to customer service – is priceless, we believe.


At Ponte, we’re all about the people.


Great food doesn’t hurt, either.

Friends, we may not be The French Laundry, but we promise we’re worth a visit.  First off, you can actually get a reservation at The Restaurant at Ponte and our fine dining counterpart, Bouquet (FL is booked solid months in advance).  Though not mandatory, we highly encourage a prior reservation on the weekends.  Read our menus here but let the food speak for itself when you come.  Secondly, Trip Advisor reviewers recently voted our boutique hotel, Ponte Vineyard Inn, as the 13th best hotel in America.  We are more than honored by this, mostly because this rank is based on guest’s reviews and satisfaction.  Finally, our wines are drinkable, delicious and unpretentious; they are made to suit the tastes of our guests, not of wine critics and panelists.


Made by the farmers at Ponte, from vine to bottle.


Our hotel, among the best – literally – in the USA

No, we’re not Napa.  Never would want to be. We’re Temecula wine country and we’re awesome.

–Erica Martinez

Categories: North America

Pages

Content Copyright © by the RSS feed producers | Concept Copyright © 2011-2012 Martinig & Associates | Vignerons du Net | Wine Search
Theme by Danetsoft and Danang Probo Sayekti inspired by Maksimer